Lawrence Lanes

1820 W. Lawrence Ave.

7 Responses to “Lawrence Lanes”

  1. Doug Cooper Says:

    This is such a great photo. I love the “arena” setting; rows of spectator seats behing the baseball-like bench settees. Today, instead of looking like a sporting event, the centers look more like a stroll into your living room – what with the couch-like seating and so forth. I guess that’s what open bowlers want. It still makes me sick.

    • J.R. Schmidt Says:

      Pla-Mor Lanes, at 79th and Jeffery in Chicago, really was an arena. When you entered at street level, it seemed like the lanes were in the basement, and somebody had removed the whole first floor. I don’t have any interior photos of Pla-Mor. However,it’s the setting for a short film Joe Wilman did in the late 1940s, and the arena layout is clearly visible.

  2. Ralph Says:

    This place had to be torn down in the early 1970’s. When I lived there in the neighborhood, I always remembered it as a parking lot for Sears.

    • Diane Hackett Says:

      Are you sure the address is 1820 W. Lawrence in Chicago? People I know who were around there in the 1950’s do not remember it. There were many other bowling alleys on Lawrence but none at this address as far as anyone in the neighborhood knows.

      • J.R. Schmidt Says:

        The picture is from 1939, and 1820 West Lawrence Avenue is the address that was given. Probably the building was torn down when Sears needed a parking lot.
        –JRS

  3. Ralph Says:

    I checked the Historic Aerials photo for 1938 and you can see the bowling alley. I also found online that the bowling alley, (1820-1824) was built in 1933. It does not say when it was torn down. The aerial photo for 1952 shows that the bowling alley was gone and the Sears Auto Center was built in that spot. I could not find any information on what year the auto center was built.

    I apologize for my August 16 comment. I can’t believe that bowling was torn down less than 20 years old.

  4. Steven Says:

    I think there was a BIG fire in the late 1940’s that gutted the place.

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